Thailand / North Thailand / Chiang Mai / Panyaden International School

Panyaden International School Q & A

Panyaden International School delivers a slightly alternative approach to education – one that is rooted in life skills, Buddhist principles and eco-friendly awareness.
At a glance
School type
International
School phase
Primary
Inspection rating
No rating
Availability 2020/21
No data
Availability 2021/22
No data
Annual fee average
THB 268,000
Annual fees
THB 205,000 - 331,000
Price band help
Mid-range
Status
Open
Opening year
2001
School year
Aug to Jun
Principal
Michel Thibeault and Daiju Vithayathil
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LET'S GO

Welcome to the Panyaden International School official Q and A page. Here we ask the questions, and the school answers directly. It is its chance to have its say on specific areas you have told us you want to know about. If you think there are additional questions we should be asking you may contact us here.

Does your school have a waiting list? In which years?

The school operates a first-come-first-served enrolment policy. To secure a place for the new school year, new parents can opt to pay a deposit of 50,000 Baht in advance. This fee is non-refundable should parents later choose to withdraw their application.

What are qualities and characteristics that define your school and its students?

Panyaden International School was founded to deliver a truly holistic approach to education that integrates Buddhist principles and a value-based education for a sustainable planet. 

Our vision is to see our children excel academically and enrich their physical, social, emotional and intellectual well-being. We accomplish this through the use of the UK National and Thai National curricula, culminating in the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme. 

We aim to develop a caring and compassionate understanding of the environment that will benefit our students, the people they meet, and the planet. 

How many nationalities are represented in your school? How international would you say your school is?

The following 36 nationalities make up Panyaden’s student body:

British, Thai, American, Chinese, Canadian, Korean, Nepali, Australian, Austrian, Belgian, Chilean, Chinese (Macao), Chinese(Taiwanese), Indian, Dutch, Ecuadorean, French, Mongolian, German, Chinese(Hong Kong), Indonesian, Israeli, Poland, Italian, Japanese, Russian, Srilankan, Malaysia, Filipino, Nigerian, Qatar, Spain, Sweden, Finland, Myanmar and Vietnam.

Are there high proportions of a particular nationality?

Dual nationals

What is the teacher: student ratio in your school?

Maximum number of students per teacher/TA each level:

Nursery: 1:6
Kindergarten 1-2: 1:7
Year 1: 1:9
Year 2-6: 1:9
Year 7-13: 1:9 (per advisor)

Does your school measure Value Added data? Please provide details of how you measure, and current Value Added benchmark scores.

N/A.

If external examinations and assessments are part of your curriculum, which ones do you offer?

Measuring Academic Progress (MAP) is used by thousands of schools around the world to track primary students’ progress in Maths, English and Science. It provides a snapshot of every student’s knowledge and identifies specific areas of strength and weakness. We run these short assessments two or three times a year in order to help teachers see how students are progressing against the objectives in those subjects and to enable them to set specific learning goals based on the strengths and weaknesses identified.

Students in Year 6-9 will also be taking a standardized assessment. This assessment is widely used by many international schools to provide data on certain aspects of student learning. The 'ISA' assessment is an assessment programme that has been specially developed to measure skills in mathematical literacy, scientific literacy, reading and writing of students according to internationally accepted standards.

The International Baccalaureate Diploma requires a demanding, pre-university course of study that leads to external examinations. The IB Diploma curriculum is a comprehensive, two-year programme that aims for students to share in an academic experience that emphasises critical thinking, intercultural understanding and exposure to a variety of perspectives. Students must receive a minimum of 24 points in order to graduate with an IB Diploma. The maximum possible number of points is 45 – a maximum of 7 points for each subject group and a maximum of 3 points for Theory of Knowledge (ToK) and the Extended Essay. Students are also required to fulfil the requirements of the CAS (Creativity, Activity, Service) component of the IB Diploma. Students study towards three Higher Level (HL) and three Standard Level (SL) courses.

The Panyaden Academic Diploma is the culmination of a challenging, university-preparatory program for students who plan to pursue higher education upon graduation. Courses include a range of offerings including English, modern languages, individuals and societies, sciences, mathematics, art and a variety of electives. A minimum of 24 credits is required to graduate with a Panyaden Academic Diploma. One year of coursework in one subject area is worth one credit. A Panyaden Academic Diploma is a minimum requirement for acceptance to universities in the United States and Canada. This diploma will also meet the requirements for acceptance to various higher education courses in Europe and other continents.

Please provide details of how well your school did in its previous external exams for students at 16 and at 18 years of age? Please provide sufficient detail to allow parents to have a view on how academic your school is?

For Academic year 2019-2020, our highest class is Year 9. We are expanding our school alongside our current students and expect to complete all secondary levels by the Academic Year of 2022.

Students in Year 6-9 will also be taking a standardized assessment. This assessment is widely used by many international schools to provide data on certain aspects of student learning. The 'ISA' assessment is an assessment programme that has been specially developed to measure skills in mathematical literacy, scientific literacy, reading and writing of students according to internationally accepted standards.

The International Baccalaureate Diploma requires a demanding, pre-university course of study that leads to external examinations. The IB Diploma curriculum is a comprehensive, two-year programme that aims for students to share in an academic experience that emphasises critical thinking, intercultural understanding and exposure to a variety of perspectives. Students must receive a minimum of 24 points in order to graduate with an IB Diploma. The maximum possible number of points is 45 – a maximum of 7 points for each subject group and a maximum of 3 points for Theory of Knowledge (ToK) and the Extended Essay. Students are also required to fulfil the requirements of the CAS (Creativity, Activity, Service) component of the IB Diploma. Students study towards three Higher Level (HL) and three Standard Level (SL) courses.

The Panyaden Academic Diploma is the culmination of a challenging, university-preparatory program for students who plan to pursue higher education upon graduation. Courses include a range of offerings including English, modern languages, individuals and societies, sciences, mathematics, art and a variety of electives. A minimum of 24 credits is required to graduate with a Panyaden Academic Diploma. One year of coursework in one subject area is worth one credit. A Panyaden Academic Diploma is a minimum requirement for acceptance to universities in the United States and Canada. This diploma will also meet the requirements for acceptance to various higher education courses in Europe and other continents.

What percentage of your sixth form that take exams at 18 go to university, and where, in general, do they go?

N/A.

Describe your school's approach to education and teaching?

At Panyaden International School, we offer students the opportunity to complete their education from Early Years right through to High School graduation.

Our Early Years students enjoy a full-day of discovery with both non-Thai and Thai teachers through songs, literacy and numeracy learning, guided activities, individual interactions and storytelling. We offer children the opportunity to engage in play-based learning in a natural setting. Our learning approach is centred around an indoor-outdoor, free-flow combination of adult-led and child-initiated activities. Our Early Years Program is supported by highly skilled and dedicated English and Thai teachers and teaching assistants who look forward to welcoming and educating your child. We use the British Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) as our core curriculum.

Panyaden International School is a British Curriculum school that offers a high quality learning environment delivered using the International Primary Curriculum from Year 1 to Year 6. The British Curriculum is academically rigorous, highly regarded and remains the most popular choice for international schools worldwide. Using the UK curriculum alongside the IPC and Thai Language and Culture curricula results in a remarkably strong academic curriculum that keeps student-centred learning at the forefront of our approach.

Teachers work together with specialists to make sure all subjects are integrated as much as possible. A typical day includes one hour of English, Thai, Maths, and a Specialist subject with clear connections to the IPC theme. Another hour each day is spent specifically on the theme of the Integrated Unit of Learning. Some themes might have a strong history and geography focus, while others focus more on science. The International Primary Curriculum is a thematic and inquiry based curriculum organised into integrated Units of Learning. The units are in line with the UK curriculum and provide a rigorous focus on learning.

Assessment takes many forms at Panyaden. The end of unit assessments lead to a grade for each subject included in that unit. Day to day learning includes differentiation and personalised feedback. International testing provides a chance to compare our students’ achievement levels to other international schools. Regardless of the type of assessment, we make sure they all provide feedback that enriches learning.

For our Middle Years, one of the main goals of the middle school programme is to provide students with an environment that supports the rapid intellectual and personal changes happening in their lives. Middle school students move through the rapid changes that are part and parcel of their age, including the progression from the self-contained learning environment to the potentially daunting transition to high school (Years 10-13).

Our curriculum, The International Middle Years Curriculum (IMYC), not only provides a bridge from the International Primary Curriculum (IPC), but also prepares our students for the demands of analysis and synthesis that are inherent in typical high school tasks. In addition, the IMYC programme reinforces our school’s mission to develop resilient, thoughtful and caring individuals through a practical, values-based education that makes them competent global citizens.

Panyaden’s middle school programme emphasises intercultural awareness and communication, and is committed to giving students the academic and personal tools they need to be successful at the secondary level. The school offers students a safe and supportive community for their creative exploration, out-of-the-box thinking and problem-solving. Individualism and self-discovery, the respect of all cultures and the betterment of the school and local community, are all key factors in the school’s ethos.

The International Baccalaureate Diploma programme (IB) is offered for our last 2 years of high school students. The programme results in personal and academic development and, upon successful completion, a globally recognized diploma. Consistent with Panyaden’s core values and strengths, the IB diploma programme aims to develop the thinking and skills of students to become tomorrow’s leaders and change-makers.

The Panyaden Academic Diploma is the culmination of a challenging, university-preparatory programme for students who plan to pursue higher education upon graduation. Courses include a range of offerings including English, modern languages, individuals and societies, sciences, mathematics, art and a variety of electives. A minimum of 24 credits is required to graduate with a Panyaden Academic Diploma. One year of coursework in one subject area is worth one credit. A Panyaden Academic Diploma is a minimum requirement for acceptance to universities globally including the United States and Canada. This diploma will also meet the requirements for acceptance to various higher education courses in Europe and other continents.

Do you develop independent learning through homework and, if so, what are your recommendations regarding this, particularly time spent on homework?

Homework
Students in the primary years will be given activities to complete at home on a regular basis. This becomes more regular as the student moves up through the primary years. Home activities should be a useful and positive experience which complements what is being taught in class. The goal is to help students to become more independent and disciplined in their study and create an opportunity for teachers and parents to share in the students’ learning. Parents are asked to support the school by:
 Arranging a quiet, suitable place to do the activity with their children.
 Making it clear to their children that they value home activities and how they will help them make progress in school and in life.
 Checking that deadlines are met.

Panyaden International School Home assignments are your child’s responsibility—not yours. Be available to help and answer questions when they need you, but please don’t do their work for them. If you feel your child is not handling his or her responsibilities well, please contact your child’s teacher. Parents are a critical factor in a child’s academic achievement.

Following are some simple suggestions as to how you can be the most effective support when its homework time.

Area: Provide a quiet, well-lit area for your child to do his/her assignment. This area should feel comfortable and always be available at homework time.

Routine: Establish a daily time for homework. If there are no homework assignments, all students should use the time for reading. This routine helps establish a commitment to the entire academic process.

Tools: Provide tools for doing home assignments: pens, pencils, paper, computer/iPad. A desk or tabletop makes the best place to do homework—not the knees, lap, or floor.

Physical education and sport is an important aspect of a healthy lifestyle. How does your school ensure children engage in physical activity?

This entails learning about the physical world in which we live and developing a wise and balanced relationship towards it, starting from one’s own body.
 Healthy relationship with the body
 Understanding basic physical needs (food, shelter, clothing and medicine)
 Responsible use of possessions, money, tools and technology
 Responsibility towards the natural environment

At Panyaden, physical education (PE) programme focuses on cooperative games and sportsmanship. Students have a chance to participate in activities centred around 6 different themes:
– Sportsmanship
– Swimming
– Games
– Ball games
– Track and field
– Gymnastics

With a full time Activities Coordinator and a specially trained 'adventure team', all students are guided to experience adventurous and challenging activities in a safe and meaningful way. We offer trekking opportunities for every age group and an expanding program of other adventurous activities.

How does your school promote healthy lifestyles?

Four Elements of Buddhist Education (Four Bhavana)
Whereas traditional educational approaches tend to put the focus on material goals and on developing essential cognitive skills, the Buddhist view is that, to be complete, education must also focus on inner values, on the workings of the mind and emotions.

A ‘holistic’ education in the Buddhist sense refers to the Bhavana sii, or four areas of development. Two of these relate to one’s interaction with the external world and the other two with one’s internal qualities. By helping children reach their potential in both these spheres and across all four areas, we believe that we are
providing them with the best possible education.

1. Kaya Bhavana: development of one’s relationship to the physical world.
This entails learning about the physical world in which we live and developing a wise and balanced relationship towards it, starting from one’s own body.
▪ A healthy relationship with the body
▪ Understanding basic physical needs (food, shelter, clothing and medicine)
▪ Responsible use of possessions, money, tools and technology
▪ Responsibility towards the natural environment

Curriculum relevance: Nutrition, physical exercise, sport, biology, time management, computer sciences, geography, environmental studies and life skills.

2. Sila Bhavana: social and ethical development
This area entails developing a wise and balanced relationship to the social world. It includes teaching the foundations of Buddhist morality as a scheme for living together wisely with trust, integrity and social responsibility.
▪ Not harming others
▪ Right speech (speaking truthfully, agreeably and appropriately)
▪ Acting with integrity
▪ Responsibility for one’s own learning and development
▪ Responsibility towards family members, towards place of work/study and society

Curriculum relevance: Language and communication skills, social studies, performing arts, history and community service.

3. Citta Bhavana: development of the mind and emotions
This means developing skilful ways of dealing with negative emotions and cultivating and maintaining positive ones.
▪ Emotional balance
▪ Love of learning
▪ Patience, effort and resilience
▪ Concentration and mindfulness
▪ Kindness and compassion

Curriculum relevance: Meditation, 12 Wise Habits activities, life skills, art, community service and daily classroom experiences

4. Panya Bhavana: development of the intellect and wisdom
This entails training the mind to think with reason and without bias, to think creatively, constructively and to be able to reflect on experience and learn from it.
▪ Right understanding (of right and wrong, of what has value and what does not)
▪ Right intention (making decisions based on good intentions: logical, beneficial, practical)
▪ Development of wisdom at three levels: (reading and listening; creative thinking;
learning from experience)

Curriculum relevance: Maths, science, linguistics, art and design, and all forms of decision- making, critical thinking and creativity

Nutrition - Panyaden provides healthy and nutritious snacks and lunches to ensure the children have a balanced diet each day. All school lunches are prepared on site with fresh ingredients. Our lunch menu offers both Thai and international options and morning and afternoon snacks include fruit, sandwiches and other food. There is always a vegetarian option and we use brown
rice.

How do you promote healthy eating?

Panyaden International School provides healthy and nutritious snacks and lunches to ensure that students have a balanced diet each day. All school lunches are prepared on the premises from fresh ingredients. Our lunch menu offers both Thai and international options and morning and afternoon snacks include fruit, sandwiches and other healthy food.

Our policy is that children do not bring food or snacks to school unless they have special dietary needs that were discussed with the administration and that are not met by the school. We also ask that parents do not give their children food on the school premises before or after school or share food with other children.

We understand that some children may have a different diet at home and may need to make adjustments, especially newcomers to Thailand, but we feel it is beneficial for children to be encouraged to sample a variety of foods. Children are encouraged to eat all the food they are provided and always to try new and unfamiliar foods. If parents have concerns about their child’s eating habits or the food the school provides, they are asked to discuss this with their teacher.

Does the school have cafeteria facilities for the students? How does it promote a balanced diet?

Lunch is provided in the canteen while snacks are brought to the classroom.

What is the approximate average cost of a lunchtime meal?

Food Fees is included in the school Tuition Fee.

What is the starting and finishing time of your school day?

School hours are different according to student levels:
Nursery and Kindergarten 1-2, Year 1 (8:20–15:15)
Primary: Year 2-6 (8.20–15:45)
Secondary: Year 7-13 (8.20-16.00)

Is there a school uniform?

School uniform is compulsory. The uniform is designed to be comfortable and suitable for the climate.

On P.E days, P.E uniform should be worn from home. Days for standard uniform and P.E uniforms will be announced at the start of term. All uniforms are available for purchase at the School Office.

On Fridays, Thai school students across Chiang Mai wear traditional northern Thai-style dress. Children are expected to wear this or traditional clothes from another country. Casual clothes, such as T-shirt and shorts or sleeveless dresses are not permitted, even though these may have become ‘traditional’ in some countries!

On the first day of term, all students should wear school uniform. Modest dress in accordance with Thai culture is expected at all times. Shoulders, upper chest, upper back and upper legs should be covered. Jewellery or other forms of body decoration are not permitted.

Please advise on your discipline policy?

The goal of discipline is to develop self‐discipline. Our early childhood
program fosters an environment in which children learn to respect others and their surroundings. We teach and encourage children to use problem-solving and conflict resolution skills. Other discipline techniques we employ are prevention, teacher shadowing, redirection, positive modeling and gentle reminders.

The root of the word “discipline” means “a follower” or “one who learns from a teacher”. True discipline does not rely on forcing or threatening and does not use reward or punishment because those are outside factors. True discipline means that a student follows a teacher willingly and with enjoyment. Expecting high output does not equate to building discipline. We should instead focus on a student’s relationship with the activity. This is the reason why we can remember the happiness we felt when we learned something more than the actual content.

Having a good relationship with each other is the key to building a student’s discipline. If you want to teach them something, show and teach them with lots of Metta in your heart.

In secondary levels, Panyaden affirms its position that an orderly and safe place for learning will be provided for all enrolled students. In secondary school, we follow a "Positive Discipline" approach.

Positive Discipline:
● Is kind and firm.
● Help students feel a sense of belonging and significance.
● Is effective long-term.
● Teaches valuable social and life skills.
● Helps students develop a sense of being capable.

When disciplinary issues arise, they will be dealt with promptly by the faculty in
whose presence the incident occurs. Depending on the severity of the incident, the counselor, the coordinators and the secondary principal may be involved.
Depending on the severity of the incident, and at the discretion of the principal, the consequence may include a warning, counseling and/or in-school suspension or out-of-school suspension. A phone call is made to the parents informing them of the behaviour and the consequence, with a follow-up letter for home and school files.

When needed a parent/student/administration/teacher conference is held at which time a solutions oriented action plan will be developed, reviewed, or revised. The school might also require professional intervention for the student(s) involved - this may take the form of counseling by the school counselor or contract psychologist or other mutually agreed upon educational specialist(s) at the parents’ expense - this is decided on a case by case basis. The school director will be notified of any out-of-school suspensions. The intent of any consequence is to provide the students with an opportunity to learn from mistakes and make better choices.

How do you feedback progress and attainment to students and parents?

Teachers will assess students’ progress towards these goals on a daily, weekly and termly basis. Assessment of learning is based on two fundamental principles: evaluation for the purpose of developing the learner’s capacity and for appraising their achievements. The goal of assessment is to track progress, from whatever point each student starts, and identify learner needs.

Ongoing formative assessment, based on observation, informal testing and student self-evaluation, is complemented by some formal testing (summative assessment).

The latter is partly achieved through the school’s online assessment programme, Measuring Academic Progress.

How often is the more formal feedback such as reports and parent/teacher meetings?

Early Years :
- Tapestry Learning Journal is an online learning journal with weekly observations on your child's learning which detail the activity and the learning objectives met.
Nursery and K1 classes use the communication book to supplement the information provided via Tapestry.
- A Settling-In Meeting is held in October to update parents on their child’s progress.
- Student-involved parent-teacher conference takes place at the beginning of term 2 and parents and teachers review the student's Tapestry portfolio.
- Budding Day is a less formal way of reporting to parents on students’ learning via an end of unit celebration during term 1. Budding Day is a little brother of Blossom Day which is celebrated at the end of the year. The format might change from term to term, but the goal remains the same: invite parents to join them in the learning centres, sharing how they learn at school and some of their favourite activities from the unit.
- Tea with Teachers are classroom-based meetings with homeroom teachers. The first one occurs before the start of the first term. This is where parents will have the opportunity to meet their child’s classroom teachers and exchange information on expectations, the plan for the year and daily routines. Other “Tea with Teachers” are organized each term for parents to learn about and better understand the school approach.
- End of the year formal report card is issued at the end of the academic year.

Primary Years:
- End of the year formal report card is issued at the end of the academic year.
- Six Written Progress Reports: issued at the end of each of the six units of learning studied during the year.
- Reporting verbally to parents: during the students’ pick-up time, homeroom teachers have a chance to chat informally with parents.
- Student-involved parent-teacher conference and portfolio presentation take place at the beginning of term 2.
- Goal Sharing takes place towards the end of September and then again during Student-involved parent-teacher conference at the beginning of term 2.
- Portfolio presentation takes place at the beginning and the end of term 2.
- Tea with Teachers are classroom-based meetings with homeroom teachers. The first one occurs before the start of the first term. This is where parents will have the opportunity to meet their child’s classroom teachers and exchange information on expectations, the plan for the year and daily routines. Other “Tea with Teachers” are organized each term for parents to learn about and better understand the school approach.
- Budding Day is a less formal way of reporting to parents on students’ learning via an end of unit celebration during term 1. Budding Day is a little brother
- Monday emails from the homeroom teachers include a summary of the previous week and the main learning goals for the current week. You can expect it before
- ‘As needed’ Meetings: we prefer dialogue between teachers and parents about student behaviour or concerns to be in person. Should the need arise, parents and teachers are encouraged to set up an appointment to meet with each other rather than wait for student-involved parent-teacher conference.
- School-based team meetings (SBTM) bring together teachers and parents directly involved in a child’s education.

Secondary Levels

REPORT CARDS
In the secondary school, students receive four sets of report cards: two progress
reports and a report card at the end of the first and second term.
DIGITAL GROWTH PORTFOLIOS
Every student has a digital growth portfolio. At the end of each unit, students add
artifacts and reflections on these to show their learning throughout the unit. These portfolios are usually shared during student-involved parent teacher conferences.
STUDENT-INVOLVED PARENT TEACHER CONFERENCES
Twice per year, scheduled student-involved parent teacher conferences take place. Parents book appointments with subject teachers through a booking system. Students should accompany the parents/guardians to these appointments.
REQUESTING AN APPOINTMENT WITH A TEACHER
You are welcome to schedule an appointment to see a specific teacher outside of
parent teacher conferences. In order to set up an appointment, please directly
contact the teacher via email.

Which languages are taught at your school - please detail any as a first as well as second language?

Panyaden International School’s curriculum is taught in both Thai (50%) and English (50%) from Nursery right through to Year 6 (the end of Primary). Each pre-school classroom has a native Thai teacher and native English teacher who take turns in leading learning activities. In primary years, Maths and English are taught by native English teachers, PE/Life Skills, Art and Thai by native Thai teachers and Science, Social Studies, Design and Technology and Performing Arts are taught in both languages.

The Panyaden Academic Diploma and IB Diploma are the culmination of a challenging, university-preparatory program for students who plan to pursue higher education upon graduation. Courses include a range of offerings including English, modern languages (e.g Chinese, German and Thai)

Do you offer EAL or TEFL support for those students where English is not their first language?

We offer the English and Thai as an additional language (EAL and TAL) programme for students from Year 1 and above.

Do you offer a dedicated prayer room/s for students? For which faiths?

N/A.

How do you support gifted, able and talented students?

Our program provides differentiation to students of all abilities. The small teacher-student ratio ensures that our children receive the specialized instruction and learning opportunities to excel in their areas of expertise and passion.

Do you have a learning support team in your school?

We have a very individualized approach and procedure in providing the additional support students may need at different times in their learning journey.

Not all schools are staffed or resourced to offer learning support to those children with either moderate or significant learning needs. To what level can you offer support for those with learning differences?

All children are assessed by our admission team and we discuss with the parents if we can meet the needs of their child. This is an individual discussion with parents when they apply to our school.

Does your school have particular expertise in dealing with a specific learning need such as dyslexia, dyspraxia, aspergers syndrome and so forth?

We have a dedicated and experienced faculty who are able to offer support for some learning needs and all cases are individually considered.

Does your school have an educational psychologist or access to one to assess and support those youngsters with more challenging learning and emotional needs?

We offer recommendations to parents of excellent outside providers to complete comprehensive diagnosis if needed and have an onsite counselor available for students.

Do you have a parents’ group supporting the school?

We have the school’s parent-teacher group, Friends of Panyaden or FoP, to exchange information related to the school’s improvement, organise parent-run events and join fun activities with other families.

Are there opportunities for parents to support the learning, activities and events within the school or on trips other than through the parent group?

The school values the contribution of parents. We see parents as partners in the education of the students and understand that home, school and community each play a key role in the development of children. Parents may wish to contribute to the school as follows:
- Be a ‘special guest teacher’. Parents who have a special skill that may be of interest and benefit our students may be invited to join a class for a lesson or activity.
- Volunteer on school special activities.
- Join Friends of Panyaden (the school’s parent-teacher group)

Is there an opportunity for parental representation on your school Board of Governors?

At the moment our school is governed by a voluntary group of advisors and this group does include fee paying members.

Do you offer specific activities, events or information sessions for those parents new to the school and/or area?

New Parents Orientation event is set before first term starts. Early in the first term there will be an opportunity for parents to meet their child’s classroom teachers at school and exchange information on expectations, the plan for the year and daily routines.

If you are the owner or the principal of the school and note any inaccuracies, or would like to update data, you can now open an account with us. You will also be able to add admissions availability per year group, and advertise current job vacancies. This is a free service. Please help us keep prospective parents up to date with your latest information.

Are you looking for a place for your child, and want help from our school consultants? If so, click on the link below, and we will forward your request for information to the school or schools of the same type that we are confident have availability. This is a free service for our readers. Request Information

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